The birth of a child: Confusion and powerlessness. A father’s role in labour, delivery and aftercare. Part 3

POST-PARTUM LIFE

The focus post-delivery was now on developing a bond with our baby and supporting the new parents in the practical side of caring for a new child.

The focus post discharge from hospital was how my wife was adapting to mother-hood and if I was being a supportive husband and father. This is fine and appropriate – however little emphasis is placed on the partner’s emotional reaction and adaption to the birth process and new-found fatherhood.

More than once I have had male friends and family with similarly traumatic birth experiences become a little “misty-eyed” in their brief recounts of the events, only to quickly change tack and subject to return to socially acceptable male behaviour.

The medical paradigm is interested in the reduction of child and mother mortality in the least complicated and efficient manner, and ensuring mother and child are able to be discharged from care in as best shape as possible.

Support services and in many ways society also has this focus – Odent’s (2010) call for the removal of fathers from the birthing process is to improve maternal and infant outcomes. Vernon (2006) and Winder’s (2006) push for a doula or support person is a movement to remove the stress that father’s bring to the delivery situation and and effort to improve maternal and infant outcomes.

Fathers will continue to be present and realistically require involvement and engagement (Chandler & Field, 1997), with research showing higher levels of post-partum satisfaction for both parents who have shared the experience of labour and birth (Chan & Paterson-Brown, 2002).

There is very little literature or real services in improving the father’s emotional outcomes, something that should be a concern to all – as doula or no doula, once returning to home, the father is more often than not the primary support person for mother and child (Wong, Perry, & Hockenberry, 2002; Chan & Paterson-Brown, 2002).

A father still dealing with negative emotions from the birth experience could have a negative influence on the initial settling process (Chandler & Field, 1997). Support is needed; before, during and after the birth of the child in a manner and delivery structure that is appropriate and accessible.

 

Thanks for reading

 

References

 

Australian Institute of Health and Wellfare. (2011). Nursing and midwifery labour force 2009. AIHW bulletin no. 90. Canberra: AIHW.

Chan, K. K., & Paterson-Brown, S. (2002). How do fathers feel after accompanying their partners in labour and delivery? Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 22(1), 11-15.

Chandler, S., & Field, P. A. (1997). Becoming a Father: First-Time Fathers’ Experience of Labor and Delivery. The Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health, 42(1), 17-24.

Odent, M. (2010). THE MASCULINISATION OF THE BIRTH ENVIRONMENT. Retrieved September 20, 2011, from WombEcology: http://www.wombecology.com/masculinisation.html

Vernon, D. (2006). Men at Birth. Sydney: Finch Publishing.

Winder, K. (2006). Bellybelly.com.au. Retrieved September 20, 2011, from http://www.bellybelly.com.au/birth/ten-tips-on-being-a-great-birth-support-person

Wong, D., Perry, S., & Hockenberry, M. (2002). Maternal Child Nursing Care. St. Louis: Mosby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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